Get In Touch

February Newsletter

MESSAGE FROM THE CEO
Looking for Buried Treasure?(Hint. It’s in Your Utility Bill)

“X marks the spot”.
The words still capture my imagination.
When I was a kid, “X marks the spot” was the clue to buried treasure. The “X” on a map always played a pivotal role in stories of adventure, discovery and overcoming adversity.

Even though I’ve grown up, these stories are still relevant for me. Did you know for example, a map to buried treasure is delivered to your organization every month? And depending on how your company uses and spends money on energy/water, that map holds the key to hundreds of thousands of dollars every year.
That map is your utility bill.
If it were easy to find buried treasure from a utility bill, everyone would be doing it. But it’s not easy. Turning that bill into a map for buried treasure takes effort and planning. There is no, “X marks the spot” to show you where to find the information that will unlock energy cost savings.
But that could change. A mark could easily be created using something familiar to us all….

FIND THE BURIED TREASURE HERE

Happy New Year from the 360 Energy Team!

My prediction is that 2019 will be a year dominated by energy stories. Already this year, pipeline approval problems, lower oil and gas prices, carbon tax, climate change, and energy export revenues affecting the Canadian dollar have made the news. And it’s only mid-January! 

As important as these energy stories are, the most important one will go unreported. The most important energy story is that your business can actively manage energy and reduce your annual costs. In fact the return on investment in energy management typically has a very high return with limited risk. 

You may find that concept surprising. People don’t often give energy much thought, because they don’t believe they can manage or control it. Using and paying for energy is simply the cost of doing business. End of story.

At 360 Energy, we change the energy story for our customers, year after year after year. 2019 will be no different.

Our growing network of customers learns how to better control and improve their management of energy. And in the process, they save money, empower their employees, reduce their carbon footprint and build strong, positive reputations in their communities. 

Our customers’ energy stories are really stories of innovation, creativity, and optimism. In 2019, we will be sharing a few of them here.

Please enjoy this issue of The 360. We trust it will interest and inform – perhaps even inspire – you.

And may your story in 2019 be satisfying, prosperous, and happy!

Sincerely,

David Arkell, CEO

  
  

Energy is often a top 3 cost for organizations… so why isn’t it budgeted?

BE PRO-ACTIVE THIS YEAR! MAKE AN ENERGY BUDGET

Every site should have an energy budget. Early in the year is a good time to review how closely it matches your actuals and if there is anything further you can do to improve performance.
Key factors you should consider for any energy budget:

  • Know your rates – be sure to include the right rate structure in your estimates for the year.
  • Know your consumption – has it changed over time? Will it be impacted by weather? Are you planning significant changes in operating or production schedules?
  • Include all three energy components – Commodity, Distribution and Transmission (electricity) or Transportation (natural gas).
  • Ask for help – developing an energy budget should be a team effort since multiple individuals can provide insight into the questions above.

Energy Budgets are difficult as they can be impacted by so many factors:

  • Production levels
  • Weather extremes
  • Utility rates
  • Stock markets
  • and more!

A well-researched budget figure that includes flexibility for changing future conditions will ensure your site doesn’t get caught off guard at year-end.
If you have questions about how to pull it all together, call 360 Energy for assistance.

CONTACT US



Customer Highlight / Gull Valley Greenhouses

Farm Fresh Tomatoes in Frigid February 

Levi Tiemstra loves being able to provide his customers with fresh, local, high quality produce – all year round. The central Alberta greenhouse grower is succeeding in his goal, despite daunting circumstances. Canadian prairie winter nights are long and cold – adverse conditions for growing tomatoes.

In the face of these challenges however, Gull Valley Greenhouses is thriving. In fact, the Tiemstra family business recently expanded their operations, thanks in part to their proactive approach to managing energy.

READ THEIR SUCCESS STORY

   

Webinar / Join 360 Energy and guest speaker Mike Johnson, Technical Leader of the Energy Supply Team at Canada’s National Energy Board (NEB)

We review The Economics of Solar Power in Canada.If you’re interested in installing solar power on your home, business, or community facility, attend this webinar and learn about the NEB’s report and interactive dashboards to help make your decision easier.

CLICK HERE

   
  

Take advantage of weather normalization knowledge

The “Prosumer” has arrived.How will Regulators respond?

Electricity networks are facing unprecedented pressures to change.
Coal is no longer the “go to” fuel for new generation.
Large wind farms have become competitive.
“Prosumers” both produce and consume power. Energy consumers, such as greenhouse growers, are installing co-generation facilities to both power their lights and heat their buildings. Home and business owners with a small loads are installing solar panels. Regardless of size, prosumers are lowering their costs and their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
As more and more electricity consumers are aware of their choices, they are opting to take control.
Are you a prosumer? Would you like to become one? Then this article is for you.

READ NOW

Long Term Natural Gas Prices Look Stable for Consumers

Natural gas prices for consumers are likely to remain stable for the foreseeable future. This is expected to remain true even if a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal is built in British Columbia. These conclusions are contained in two recent and separate reports prepared by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI).

READ NOW